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Our People,
Your Team

Meet The Team

We have many key individuals within the firm, all playing their part in ensuring the things that matter to you work.

Charles Almond
Consultant
Liz Ashford
Legal Assistant
Rebecca Asquith
Legal Support Assistant
Bryn Auger
Legal Support Assistant
Katie Baker
Associate Solicitor
Karl Beckett
Partner
Karen Bell
Senior Conveyancing Assistant
Georgia Bennett
Legal Support Assistant
Amy Bills
Solicitor
Clare Boote
Legal Secretary
Claudia Booth
Trainee Solicitor
Matthew Bowering
Partner
Matte Brasenell
Legal Support Assistant
Melanie Brider-Birch
Legal Support Assistant
Sophie Bridges
Solicitor
Mandy Brookfield
Litigation Assistant
Debbie Brooks
HR Manager
Emma Broomfield
Partner
Louise Browne
Legal Assistant
Amy Burgoyne
Legal Support Assistant
Sophie Burgoyne
Solicitor
Edward Burrell
Partner
Praveen Chaudhari
Partner - Head of Commercial & Agricultural and Residential Property Teams
Karen Clarke
Associate Legal Executive (FCILEX)
Vicky Clishem
Solicitor
Fiona Cooper
Legal Assistant
Steven Corfield
Principal Agricultural Consultant
Abi Croft
Solicitor
Hollie Daniels
Legal Support Assistant
Nicola Davies
Solicitor
Neil Davies
Partner - Head of Court of Protection Team
Emma Deering
Associate Legal Executive (FCILEX)
Isabella Drummond
Paralegal Apprentice
Calum Eagles
Trainee Solicitor
Juana Eastwood
Solicitor
Jennifer Edwards
Associate Solicitor
Paul Ellis
Finance Director & Partner
Kaylee Evans
Legal Assistant
Brian Evans
Managing Partner
Emma Farrington
Solicitor
Bethany Fennell
Debt Recovery Administrator
Vanessa Ford
Legal Assistant
Helen Gale
Legal Support Assistant
Sarah Gallagher
Trainee Solicitor
Kelly Gibbons
Legal Support Assistant
Natasha Gibbons
Associate Solicitor
Stephanie Gore
Legal Support Assistant
Susan Grazier
Associate Solicitor
Lisa Grimmett
Associate Solicitor
Morgan Hanley
Legal Support Assistant
Afsarah Haque-Hassan
Trainee Solicitor
Sara Harris
Legal Support Assistant
Beth Heath
Partner - Head of Clinical/Medical Negligence Team
Liane Helies
Legal Support Assistant
Kristy Henderson
Legal Assistant
Angharad Hird
Associate Solicitor
Chris Hodgson
Legal Assistant
Sue Hodgson
Partner - Head of Family Law Team
Adam Hodson
Associate Solicitor
Liam Holyhead
Debt Recovery Manager
Miriam Homer
Solicitor
Martin Hood
Solicitor
Jan Hope
Legal Secretary
Val Howard
Legal Secretary
Abigail Huband
Associate Legal Executive (FCILEX)
Kelly Hughes
Legal Support Assistant
Danielle Hughes
Legal Assistant
David Hughes
Costs Manager
Georgina Hughes
Associate Solicitor
Debbie Humphries
Partner
Dawn Humphries
Partner - Head of Personal Injury Team
Shelley Hyde-Catton
Legal Support Assistant
Lisa Isherwood
Legal Secretary
Kate Ivey
Legal Assistant (ACILEX)
Tom James
Legal Support Assistant
Alicia Johns
Chartered Legal Executive
Aimee Johnson
Solicitor
Janette Johnston
Senior Conveyancing Assistant
Clare Jones
Legal Support Assistant
Leanne Jones
Trainee Solicitor
Heloise Jones
Residential Conveyancing Support
Laura Jones
Solicitor
Emma Jones
Associate Solicitor and Team Leader
Helen Jones
Legal Secretary
Amanda Jones
Marketing Director
Saffia Keegan
Solicitor
Kay Kelly
Consultant
Jo Kneller
Solicitor
Naila Kosser
Legal Executive
Julie Langford
Legal Assistant
Nicola Large
Accounts Manager
Kate Lawson
Associate Solicitor
Mai Lewis
Solicitor
Emma Lewis
Chartered Legal Executive
Anne Lewis
Associate Legal Executive (FCILEX)
Danielle Lloyd
Legal Support Assistant
Laura Lougher
Associate Solicitor
Sarah Martin
Costs Draftsman
Mandy Mason
Chartered Legal Executive (FCILEX)
Lauren McCarthy
Legal Support Assistant
Tania McGee
Associate Solicitor
John Merry
Senior Partner - Head of Employment Team
Chloe Michie
Legal Assistant
Jane Miles
Associate Solicitor
Jennifer Monaghan
Associate Solicitor
Jon Moriarty
Partner
Andrew Morris
Trainee Costs Draftsman
William Morse
Partner - Employment & Education
Emily Mouland
Trainee Solicitor
Ola Muras
Legal Support Assistant
Susan Newbould
Solicitor
Edward Nutting
Partner
Tom O'Rourke
Senior Compliance Officer
Jemma Parocki
Trainee Solicitor
Erin Payne
Legal Support Assistant
Philippa Pearson
Partner
Andrew Pegg
Partner - Head of Dispute Resolution Team
Cameron Petch
Paralegal Apprentice
Jamie Porter
Solicitor
David Pugh
Partner
Debbie Ray
Debt Recovery Administrator
Edward Rees
Partner - Head of Private Client Team
Toni Reeves
Solicitor
Kelly Reynolds
Trainee Solicitor
Zoe Roberts
Associate Solicitor
Llinos Roberts
Solicitor
Phillip Roberts
Partner
Staci Robinson
Associate Solicitor
Georgia Rowney
Legal Support Assistant
Sam Russell
Legal Assistant
Dani Sharma
Legal Support Assistant
Nicola Simmons
Legal Assistant
Lucy Small
Partner
Nicole Smith
Legal Support Assistant
Nicola Smith
Legal Support Assistant
Stewart Smith
Associate Solicitor
Phyllis Smith
Senior Litigation Assistant
Alexander Spanner
Solicitor
Lucy Speed
Partner
Sophie Speirs
Trainee Solicitor
Cassie Stocker
Legal Support Assistant
Nosheen Tabassum
Compliance Officer
Robin Thain
IT Manager
Kevin Thomas
Partner
Morgan Thompson
Legal Assistant
Rachel Tomley
Solicitor
Tim Treherne
Partner - Residential Property Team
Claire Vale
Associate Solicitor
Rowland Waddington
Operations Manager
Carole Walker
Legal Support Assistant
Gráinne Walters
Partner - Head of Corporate & Commercial Team
Laura Weir
Partner
Sarah Whittall
Partner
Mia Williams
Trainee Solicitor
Sioned Williams
Solicitor
Chloe Williams
Solicitor
Gemma Williams
Solicitor
Gemma Workman
Solicitor
Claire Yardley
Partner
Caroline Yorke
Associate Solicitor

Latest News

28 Feb 2024

Increase In Tribunal Compensation Limits

The government has announced the annual increase in compensation limits for employment tribunal awards and other statutory payments that, subject to parliamentary approval, will take effect from 6 April 2024.

The two key increases are:

  • maximum compensatory award for ordinary unfair dismissal: £105,707 to £115,115.
  • limit on a week’s pay: £643 to £700.

It is important to remember that the context of the above maximum compensatory award is, that the limit on compensatory awards is actually the lower of an amount equal to the employee’s basic annual salary and the stated maximum.

The limit on weekly pay is applied in a number of contexts, including basic awards for unfair dismissal, statutory redundancy pay and awards of compensation that are made due to an employee not having been issued with written particulars of employment that comply with statutory minimum requirements.

The maximum possible basic award or statutory redundancy payment will therefore increase to £21,000.

Statutory guarantee pay, which applies when an employee is laid off or subjected to short-time working, will increase from £35 to £38 per day.

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22 Feb 2024

Oesophageal Cancer Awareness Month: Know the Signs

February is Oesophageal Cancer Awareness Month, which is a crucial time to shine a light on an often-overlooked cancer. This is a topic close to my heart as a close family member has recently been diagnosed with oesophageal cancer and is currently embarking on their own treatment journey.

Not only this, but as a clinical negligence solicitor, I see first-hand the devastating impact delayed diagnosis and misdiagnosis can have on patients and their families. It is important for people to not only become familiar with the signs and symptoms of oesophageal cancer, but also understand their legal rights in case of medical negligence.

What is Oesophageal Cancer?

Oesophageal cancer, affecting the tube connecting the mouth to the stomach, is the eighth most common cancer globally. Despite its prevalence, awareness remains low, which hinders early diagnosis and potentially leading to poorer outcomes. Early detection is critical for improving survival rates, which currently stand at a concerning 16% five-years after diagnosis.

Know the Signs

Being aware of the symptoms of oesophageal cancer can allow you to seek prompt medical attention, potentially improving your chances of a successful diagnosis and treatment. Key signs include:

  • Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia), especially solids.
  • Heartburn and acid reflux that don't respond to medication.
  • Chest pain, often burning or squeezing.
  • Unexplained weight loss.
  • Persistent coughing or hoarseness.

One critical issue when it comes to early diagnosis is that the above symptoms can often have multiple causes, and it is therefore vital to seek the advice of your GP as soon as you suspect something is not normal for you.

Treatment

Oesophageal cancer can be treatable, but it can be difficult to treat and will depend on the size and type of cancer it is; the location (i.e. where in the oesophagus); if it has spread to nearby nodes, tissues and organs; and a person’s general health.

If your surgeon has indicated that your oesophageal cancer is potential curable, treatment usually entails chemotherapy followed by surgery, with additional chemotherapy afterwards. Sometimes instead of pre-surgical chemotherapy you may be offered radiotherapy, and sometimes you could be offered a combination of the two.

If the cancer is sadly not curable, there are targeted medicines and immunotherapy which can aid in symptom control and improve quality of life.

If you or a loved one experiences delayed or missed diagnoses of oesophageal cancer, impacting your health and wellbeing, seeking legal advice is crucial. Clinical negligence claims can help you access:

  • Compensation for pain, suffering, and loss of income.
  • Funding for ongoing medical care and rehabilitation.
  • Accountability against the healthcare providers involved.

Don't Delay, Be Proactive!

  • Educate yourself: Visit the websites of organisations like Cancer Support and Macmillan Cancer Support for comprehensive information.
  • Seek medical advice: Discuss any concerns you have with your doctor, especially if you notice any changes which are not normal for you;
  • Seek legal advice: If you suspect negligence has impacted your oesophageal cancer diagnosis or treatment, please contact Lanyon Bowdler’s specialist team of medical negligence solicitors or by emailing info@lblaw.co.uk

By raising awareness of Oesophageal Cancer Awareness Month and sharing advice and support, we can empower ourselves and our loved ones to fight for better healthcare and hold negligent parties accountable.

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14 Feb 2024

Is My Will Watertight?

The short answer is no. However, there are a range of options available in order to mitigate the risk of family members making a claim against your estate once you have passed away.

If someone tries to make a claim against your estate once you have passed, this would be governed by the Inheritance (Provision for Family and Dependents Act) 1975. A person can only bring a claim against the estate if they are:

  • A spouse or civil partner of the deceased;
  • A former spouse or civil partner of the deceased (that has not remarried);
  • Any person whom for two years immediately prior to the death of the deceased was living with the deceased as if they were a married couple or civil partners;
  • A child of the deceased;
  • Any person (who was not a child of the deceased) but was treated by the deceased as a child of the family;
  • Any person who immediately before the death was being maintained wholly or partially by the deceased.

When considering a claim, the court will have regard to:

  • The financial resources and financial needs which the applicant has or is likely to have in the foreseeable future;
  • The financial resources and financial needs which any other applicant for an order under S.2 of the Act has or is likely to have in the foreseeable future;
  • The financial resources and financial needs which any beneficiary of the estate of the deceased has or is likely to have in the foreseeable future;
  • Any obligations and responsibilities which the deceased had towards any applicant for an order under the said S.2 or towards any beneficiary of the estate of the deceased;
  • The size and nature of the estate of the deceased;
  • Any physical or mental disability of any applicant for an order under the said S.2 or any beneficiary of the estate of the deceased;
  • Any other matter, including the conduct of the applicant or any other person, which in the circumstances of the case the court may consider.

In some cases, it may be appropriate to also include a letter of wishes that will record your wishes in further detail, also explaining why you have made the specific distributions to certain people or organisations. Although this is not mandatory, it will assist in providing further evidence to the court if someone were to contest your will.

There is no guarantee that a claim will not be brought against your estate when you die however a properly drafted will can reduce the grounds on which any potential claimant could make a claim and it is therefore essential that your will is drafted correctly and concisely to reflect your true wishes.

Having a will in place is a fundamental step in ensuring your assets and wealth is distributed how you would like it to be after your death. Without a will, you will run the risk of the intestacy rules dictating how your estate will pass which could result in estranged family members far down the blood-line inheriting all or part of your estate. Please see our previous blog: Intestacy (Dying Without a Will) – What Will My Spouse/Civil Partner Get? for further information about dying intestate.

If you are concerned about a family member making a claim against your estate after you die, please get in touch with Lanyon Bowdler where our dedicated team can give you specific advice regarding your circumstances.

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Latest Case Study

01 Feb 2024

Death of Young Mother of Three Could Have Been Avoided

Kate, a 34 year old mother of three, presented to A&E at Wrexham Maelor Hospital with a seven day history of diar...

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30 Nov 2022

Hospital Missed Key Symptoms Leading to Life Changing Injury

Cauda Equina Syndrome

This claim settled by Laura Weir arises from the delay in diagnosis ...

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17 Jun 2022

Misfiled Radiology Report Causes Catastrophic Harm

Mr L originally presented to Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust (SaTH) in 2011 with suspected kidney stones. H...

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